Auto International Association Installs Two New Board Members

first_imgBETHESDA, Md. – The Auto International Association (AIA), a segment of the Automotive Aftermarket Industry Association (AAIA), installed two new board members at its May meeting during AAIA Spring Leadership Days in Hollywood, Fla. The newly elected board members are Bob Clark, director of aftermarket sales, Aisin World Corp. of America, and Dan Lelchuk, president, Centric Parts.   Clark joined Aisin in 1991 and is responsible for OES, accessory and aftermarket sales in North America and Latin American countries. His previous experience includes 14 years with Champion Spark Plug and six years with Genuine Parts Co. Clark is a member of the Automotive Sales Council and the Northwood University Advisory Board, and a former member of AASA Marketing Executives Committee.   Lelchuk has been part of the automotive aftermarket business since 1976, holding positions with several import parts suppliers including Beck/Arnley and Brembo. He spent 13 years with Autospecialty as vice president, sales and marketing, and is an original partner in the forming of Centric Parts in 2000. As Centric president, Lelchuk has developed extensive knowledge of trade and regulatory issues affecting the import aftermarket.   Two incumbent directors were elected to another term: • Peter Klotz, WORLDPAC Inc. • Patricia Law, ANSA Automotive Parts Distributors Inc.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Continuing board members are: • Chairman Brian Cohn, Multi Parts Supply USA Inc. • Vice Chairman Jeffery Berman, Bosal USA Inc. • Secretary Mary DellaValle, Babcox Media • Treasurer Stephen Bearden, H.B. International Marketing Services • Thomas Beer, Interamerican Motor Corp. • W. Michael Brown, Olympus Imported Auto Parts Corp. • Martin Gold, S-G Imported Car Parts Inc. • Anthony (Tony) Perticarilast_img read more

The Damn Band From Taos Rocks Summer Concert

first_imgThe Damn Band headlines the Los Alamos Secret City Summer Concert Friday at Ashley Pond Pavilion. Photo by Bonnie J. Gordon/ladailypost.com Lead vocalist of The Damn Band from Taos performs during the Los Alamos Secret City Summer Concert Friday at Ashley Pond Pavilion. Photo by Bonnie J. Gordon/ladailypost.com A crowd gathers Friday evening at Ashley Pond Park for the Secret City Summer Concert. Photo by Bonnie J. Gordon/ladailypost.com.center_img Light it up! Photo by Bonnie J. Gordon/ladailypost.comlast_img

NIST’s Light-Sensing Camera May Help Detect Extraterrestrial Life, Dark Matter

first_imgMicrograph of NIST’s high-resolution camera made of 1,024 sensors that count single photons, or particles of light. The camera was designed for future space-based telescopes searching for chemical signs of life on other planets. The 32-by-32 sensor array is surrounded by pink and gold wires connecting to electronics that compile the data. Courtesy/V. Verma/NIST With more than 1,000 sensors, or pixels, NIST’s camera may be useful in future space-based telescopes searching for chemical signs of life on other planets, and in new instruments designed to search for the elusive “dark matter” believed to constitute most of the “stuff” in the universe.  Verma and colleagues achieved high fabrication success, with 99.5 percent of the sensors working properly. But detector efficiency at the desired wavelength is low. Boosting efficiency is the next challenge. The researchers also hope to make even bigger cameras, perhaps with a million sensors. The work was supported by NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. “The idea is to look at the absorption spectra of light passing through the edge of an exoplanet’s atmosphere as it transits in front of its parent star,” Verma explained. “The absorption signatures tell you about the elements in the atmosphere, particularly those that might give rise to life, such as water, oxygen and carbon dioxide. The signatures for these elements are in the mid- to far-infrared spectrum, and large-area single-photon counting detector arrays don’t yet exist for that region of the spectrum, so we received a small amount of funding from NASA to see if we could help solve that problem.” The camera performance was measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California. JPL has the necessary electronics due to its work on deep space optical communications. NIST’s camera is small in physical size, a square measuring 1.6 millimeters on a side, but packed with 1,024 sensors (32 columns by 32 rows) to make high-resolution images. The main challenge was to find a way to collate and obtain results from so many detectors without overheating. The researchers extended a “readout” architecture they previously demonstrated with a smaller camera of 64 sensors that adds up data from the rows and columns, a step toward meeting the requirements of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). “My primary motivation for making the camera is NASA’s Origins Space Telescope project, which is looking into using these arrays for analyzing the chemical composition of planets orbiting stars outside of our solar system,” NIST electronics engineer Varun Verma said. Each chemical element in the planet’s atmosphere would absorb a unique set of colors, he pointed out. center_img Described in Optics Express, the camera consists of sensors made from superconducting nanowires, which can detect single photons. They are among the best photon counters in terms of speed, efficiency, and range of color sensitivity. A NIST team used these detectors to demonstrate Einstein’s “spooky action at a distance,” for example.  The new camera was made in a complicated process at NIST’s Microfabrication Facility in Boulder, Colorado. The detectors are fabricated on silicon wafers diced into chips. The nanowires, made of an alloy of tungsten and silicon, are about 3.5 millimeters long, 180 nanometers (nm) wide and 3 nm thick. The wiring is made of superconducting niobium. Other applications are also possible. For example, the NIST cameras may help find dark matter. Researchers around the world have been unable to find so-called weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) and are considering looking for dark matter with lower energy and mass. Superconducting nanowire detectors offer promise for counting emissions of rare, low-energy dark matter and discriminating real signals from background noise. NIST News: The nanowire detectors also have the lowest dark count rates of any type of photon sensor, meaning they don’t count false signals caused by noise rather than photons. This feature is especially useful for dark-matter searches and space-based astronomy. But cameras with more pixels and larger physical dimensions than previously available are required for these applications, and they also need to detect light at the far end of the infrared band, with longer wavelengths than currently practical. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made one of the highest-performance cameras ever composed of sensors that count single photons, or particles of light.last_img read more

Aberdeen Asset Management takes final stake in The Fort shopping park

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Five new deals for Enfield Retail Park

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Permatex Appoints Paco Agrafojo As Director Of Marketing

first_imgPermatex, a provider of chemical technology for automotive maintenance and repair, has named Paco Agrafojo to head its marketing team. As director of marketing, Agrafojo will be responsible for driving product innovation, engaging consumers through the brands and providing Permatex’s retail partners with viable solutions to drive their category growth. He also will support the sales team efforts in business development for the retail, traditional and international channels.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementThe announcement was made by Andy Robinson, Permatex vice president and general manager, who noted, “We are very excited to have Paco join our management team. He comes to us with over 20 years of experience in marketing and sales and has worked extensively in the development of new products and the marketing and analytics of consumer goods. We look forward to the leadership and strategic vision for growth that he will bring to our business.”Prior to joining Permatex, Agrafojo spent five years with Newell Brands/The Yankee Candle Co., serving first as director of customer marketing and then as the director of category and customer analytics. In these roles, Agrafojo was responsible for leading the development of a divisional business analytics team, the analytics of marketing and promotional activities, and new product launch strategy for the company’s wholesale division. Before The Yankee Candle Co., Agrafojo worked as director of trade marketing for Med Foods Inc., and as senior category manager for Heineken USA.Paco Agrafojo holds a Bachelor of Arts in organizational communication from the University of Central Florida. He also is a member of the Central Florida Alumni Chapter of Delta Upsilon Fraternity.last_img read more

Messer Americas applauds healthcare workers

first_imgThe US industrial gas company has said that it remains committed to doing its part to support the healthcare industry during the global health emergency.“Messer teams continue working to ensure reliable delivery of our life-saving medical gases, including oxygen for hospitals and helium for MRIs, supporting critically ill patients and the healthcare systems,” the company said on a recent social post.“Thank you to our nurses, drivers and dedicated employees on the front lines of delivering our essential products and services to hospitals and patients throughout the region.”“Health and safety remain our top priorities – and we’re all in this together.”As an essential supplier of oxygen to medical facilities across the nation, Messer is taking proactive steps to enable a safe and reliable supply of medical oxygen and related services to hospitals and medical care facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.Teams at Messer are proactively working with hospitals to understand their current and projected oxygen supply needs and are vigilantly monitoring their usage rates to prioritise shipments and identify capacity constraints at hospitals with rising demand for critical medical USP oxygen.last_img read more

Supreme Court divorce decision could ‘open the floodgates’

first_imgThe Supreme Court’s decision to top up the financial award made to a divorcee by a Nigerian court could ‘open the floodgates to forum shopping’ and further clog the London courts, family lawyers have warned. The court ruled that a settlement reached in a Nigerian court would have caused ‘real hardship’ to the former wife, and reinstated the decision of the High Court to award a higher lump sum. Olusola and Sikirat Agbaje had been married for 38 years before divorcing in Nigeria. They spent much of that time in Nigeria, but had acquired British citizenship and had five children who were born in England. Meredith Thompson, senior solicitor in the family team at national firm Mills & Reeve, said: ‘This could open the floodgates to “forum shopping” by former spouses disappointed by the awards made to them in the divorce courts of other countries.’ She said the likely increase in the number of overseas litigants would be an ‘unwelcome addition’ to the case load of the London courts and ‘elongate the already lengthy delays’.   James Copson, partner at London firm Withers, said the ruling would give rise to increasing numbers of disgruntled overseas litigants coming to England for ‘a second bite of the cherry’, causing delay to other High Court cases. ‘This decision drives a coach and horses through the doctrine of comity, affording a sense of courtesy to the decisions of friendly foreign courts,’ he said. ‘It smacks of our colonial past and is at odds with our ­treatment of our European neighbours.’ But Marilyn Stowe, partner at Harrogate firm Stowe Family Law, said she was not concerned the case would lead to a rush of litigation from overseas. She added: ‘Past jurisprudence where people have tried and failed to get settlements overturned shows that the bar is set high. The present case is exceptional. I don’t think reasonable provision was made by the Nigerian court.’last_img read more

The dismal profession

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Complexity theory: Interconnected disputes

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more